The Monument

North Carolina’s First Women’s Holocaust Monument

The photograph vs. the artist’s sketch

In Poland on Monday, Dec. 15, 1941, thousands of Jewish women and children were taken to the women’s prison in Liepaja. From there, in the freezing cold, they were marched to a nearby beach called Skede, forced to strip to their underclothes, taken to the edge of a trench and shot dead in groups of 10. After three straight days of methodical slaughter, 2,749 Jews, mostly women and children — had been murdered. The victims were photographed in their final moments by a Nazi photographer.  One such photograph serves as the basis for this Monument.


“She Wouldn’t Take Off Her Boots”

Building upon the 75th anniversary of the liberation of Auschwitz and the end of the Holocaust, “She Wouldn’t Take Off Her Boots” will be North Carolina’s First Women’s Holocaust Monument.  This original sculpture by artist Victoria Milstein will honor the strength and resilience of all women. 

The Monument will be beautifully situated in Carolyn’s Garden in LeBauer Park, becoming a “place making “community experience for the public to not only remember the Holocaust, but also have the impactful opportunity to “ Be a Witness.”  A portion of the Monument will be made from EConcrete, an Israeli based technology, that will serve to tie the Holocaust to the land of Israel. The Monument will honor those who perished and make a statement against the murder of women and children, antisemitism and all genocide.  

This initiative may be used to support compliance with North Carolina’s Holocaust Education Act, which requires the State Board of Education to include instruction of the Holocaust and genocide. Situated next to the library at LeBauer Park, the Monument offers visual tools for scholars and Holocaust educators. 

Educating new generations about how the past can inform the present.  We are proud that the site of this Monument will be in Greensboro, a city that recognizes the diversity of our community and is committed to using the Arts as a vehicle to educate and unite communities.  

We are proud that the site of this Monument will be in Greensboro, a city that recognizes the diversity of our community and is committed to using the Arts as a vehicle to educate and unite communities.